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Workshop Graduate

Completed a DomeGaia workshop

  • RE: MIn. thickness of aircrete block

    @ssundar1
    Personally, if the brick has to be moved, no less than 2" while also using plenty of poly fiber, and glycerin in the mix.

    posted in AirCrete
  • RE: Equatorial Bulge

    @Matt-Prosser Really nice work! clean!

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: dome berming

    @Ignacio-DHOME So my idea is to build a bermed dome with a water catchment trough that will lead to a cistern made of cans, mortar and lined with a EPDM- as Earthships do for grey water flushing. The other less difficult and useful way is to put it into the soil... Any thoughts?

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: How does Aircrete perform in cold climates?

    @Altitude-High Oh! sorry. Well, I am not an engineer so if you want an empirical answer, I am not the one to give it. My only thought on this topic is that an egg shaped dome will be much more resistant to load and will shed the snow more easily. I also believe that the compressive strength because of the vertical lift of the shape, has greater strength. An egg shape is incredibly strong. The dome is as well, but not as much. The Florence domes were based on the quinto acuto because of its vertical lift to counter act gravities forces downward that causes "lateral stress".

    posted in AirCrete
  • RE: How does Aircrete perform in cold climates?

    @Altitude-High I have experienced that in a cold wet environment it takes a little longer to set up and so may collapse a little. I recommend adding glycerin or a way to quicken the drying process with a dryer...

    posted in AirCrete
  • RE: Equatorial Bulge

    @upwinger I have thought of water catchment myself. If you do berm all you need to do maybe is ledge the dome with a trough that runs along the side of the dome at a 1/4 inch per foot fall. The fabric and glue would work to do this. It would probably look best if it was below the berm line and graveled so the water falls into the catchment.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Equatorial Bulge

    @Leonidas I like all these ideas. I am feeling that the rebar is a little bit over engineering though. The bricks are brittle and think that maybe applying a rigid material like rebar will: one, make it difficult in applying, and two, create such a rigid structure that the bricks will be compromised tremendously if there is an earthquake. I love the basalt mesh idea. To me, with this, it will be plenty strong along with the structural integrity of the dome shape itself to resist falling and breaking off. Making something to resist the forces of nature I feel is a fallacy in engineering that is changing. Harmonizing with movement and the natural integrity of natures forms is the way to go. My two cents...you ARE the the engineer though and it will be you and your family inside:)

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Equatorial Bulge

    Mesh both inside and out. Not sure I followed the basalt mesh idea? For strength add poly fiber sold anywhere to add to the mix.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Equatorial Bulge

    By the way, I did not really answer your question. NO, domes do not need an equatorial bulge. Straight walls are fine. The benefit of the bulge is aesthetics and possible counter force to a earth berming if you plan to bury it. Straight walls with curved radius are strong retaining walls also.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Equatorial Bulge

    @Leonidas FASCINATING WORK LEO! I would lean towards making a solid pour formed pony wall with rebar to have the strength of a bond beam. I love the hexagon idea! I am not crazy about rebar inside aircrete though. Aircrete does have a tendency to crack, which is not such a big deal when there is a poly cement fabric incasing and bonding the bricks together as one structure. Is there something else you could use that wouldn't rust, or for that matter, do you really need this step? Again, the fabric is enough in my eyes and experience. Please send pictures of the hexagon brick! Would love to see how you make one!
    Thanks for your ideas, good cutting edge research happening here!

    posted in General Discussion